A GI is a distinctive sign used for products with a specific geographical origin and possessing characteristics or reputation due to that origin. The EU-China Agreement will therefore offer important protection of the intellectual property rights of products: it protects from the translation, transcription or transliteration and use of protected geographical indications, accompanied by expressions such as „type“, „style“, „imitation“ or others, in respect of a non-originating product. On September 14, 2020, China and the European Union signed a bilateral agreement on geographical indications (GIs). The agreement protects 100 g of European indicators in China and 100 g of Chinese ratios in the European Union. The agreement is expected to enter into force in early 2021. Within four years of its entry into force, the scope of the Agreement shall be extended to an additional 175 GIs of each Party. This is the first major bilateral trade agreement signed between the EU and China. The agreement is expected to enter into force in 2021. Four years later, about 175 other GIs from both sides will be included in the agreement. On 10 September 2010, the Council authorised the opening of negotiations for a PGI agreement with China. The date and place of signature of the agreement have not yet been determined. Once signed, the agreement must receive the consent of the European Parliament before it can be concluded and enter into force.

„I am proud that this agreement is approaching its entry into force and reflects our commitment to cooperate closely with our global trading partners such as China,“ said Janusz Wojciechowski, European Commissioner for Agriculture and Rural Development. The European Commission has just announced that the EU and China have signed a bilateral agreement to protect geographical indications (GIs) against usurpation and counterfeiting. The agreement, first concluded in November 2019 and approved by the Council in July 2020, will protect 100 g of European indicators in China and 100 g of Chinese personal enterprises in the EU. Within four years of its entry into force, the scope of the agreement will be extended to another 175 GIs from both parties. These names must follow the same authorisation procedure as the 100 names already covered by the agreement (evaluation and publication of comments). Geographical indications coexist with legitimate earlier trademarks, the vast majority of which belong to the legitimate owners of Europe. The agreement will protect 100 European indicators and as many Chinese figures in the EU against usurpation and counterfeiting. Four years after its entry into force, the scope of the agreement is extended to 175 other GI names of both parties.

The agreement also includes a mechanism for the subsequent addition of other geographical indications. . . .